Wildfire Safety Tip

Be your home’s hero and clean your gutters, eaves and roof to make sure they are clear of debris.

Wildfire Safety Tip

Additional Wildfire Safety Tips

Protect Your Home

  • Clean your gutters, eaves and roof to make sure they are clear of debris
  • Make sure your street number is legible and clearly marked for emergency responders
  • Remove fuels that can lead flames to your home or that can become ignited from windblown embers, including:
    • Dead grass, leaves, etc. (fine fuels) and dead twigs, branches, etc. (coarse fuels) within 30 feet of buildings
    • Dry leaf/pine litter from roofs, rain gutters, decks and walkways
    • Dead and dry litter at the base of plants
    • Tree branches (ladder fuels) within 6-10 feet of the ground
    • Firewood within 30 feet of buildings
    • Continuous beds of combustible vegetation (on the ground or in tree tops) that can bring large flames within 100 feet of your home
    • Identify an emergency water supply for firefighting within 1,000 feet of your home through one of the following:
      • Community water/hydrant system, and/or
      • Drafting site on a lake
      • Cooperative emergency storage tank with neighbors
      • Swimming pool

Prepare Your Family

 

For more information on wildfire prevention visit www.flash.org.  For mobile wildfire alerts and mitigation tips, download FLASH Weather Alerts at www.flashweatheralerts.org.

Heat Wave Safety Tips

When the air conditioning is out, stay on your lowest floor or head to the mall.

Heat Wave Safety Tips

When temperatures soar, follow these safety rules:

  • The coolest part of the day is normally sunrise, so plan any necessary strenuous activity for the morning.
  • Stay indoors as much as possible. If air conditioning is not available, stay on the lowest floor, out of the sunshine.
  • Drink plenty of water even if you don’t feel thirsty as water is most hydrating liquid to drink during a heat wave.  Avoid alcohol and caffeine as they can intensify the negative effect of heat on your body.
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing to reflect some of the sun’s energy.
  • Never leave children, elderly or pets in the car even with the windows down. Although the outside air temperatures may seem comfortable, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise 40 to 50 degrees and swiftly create deadly, oven-like conditions.
  • Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.

For information on protecting your home from severe weather, visit www.flash.org.  For mobile heat advisories and safety tips, download FLASH Weather Alerts at www.flashweatheralerts.org.

Lightning Safety Tips

Go, go gadget! Protect your super gadgets by installing certified surge protectors. Share this photo to remind your friends that a simple home update can protect your home and its contents.

Lightning Safety Tips

More Lightning Safety Tips from FLASH

Federal Alliance for Safe Homes (FLASH)® offers the following tips to keep families reduce their risk of lightning injuries:

Before the Storm

  • Stay alert and listen carefully for the first signs of lightning or thunder. Remember, “If Thunder Roars, Go Indoors™.”
  • Seek shelter. Lightning often hits before the rain begins, so don’t wait for the rain to start before leaving.

If Outdoors

  • Avoid water, high ground and open spaces.
  • Stay away from metal objects including wires, fences and motors.
  • Find shelter in a sizable building or in a fully enclosed metal vehicle like a car or truck. Completely close the windows and don’t lean on the doors.
  • Don’t get under a small canopy, small picnic shelter or near trees.
  • If you cannot take shelter indoors, crouch down with your feet together and place your hands over your ears to minimize hearing damage from the thunder.
  • Stay at least 15 feet away from other people.

If Indoors

  • Avoid water and stay away from doors and windows.
  • Do not use landline telephone or headsets. Cell phones are safe.
  • Turn off, unplug and stay away from appliances, computers, power tools and televisions sets as lightning may strike exterior electric and phone lines inducing shocks to equipment inside.

After the Storm

  • Don’t resume activities until at least 30 minutes after the last lightning strike or thunderclap.
  • Call 911 immediately if anyone is injured and use first aid procedures.
  • Lightning victims do not carry an electrical charge, so it is safe to administer medical treatment.

For more information on protecting your home from extreme cold conditions, visit www.flash.org. For severe weather alerts and mitigation tips, download FLASH Weather Alerts at www.flashweatheralerts.org.

National Preparedness Month Tip of the Day

9-6-2013-flood

#NatlPrep tip of the day: Six inches of moving water can even knock down a super hero like me!  #FloodSmart #NationalWeatherService

More deaths occur due to flooding each year than from any other thunderstorm or hurricane-related hazard. Many of these casualties are a result of careless or unsuspecting motorists who attempt to navigate flooded roads. FLASH and
the National Weather Service warn anyone who comes to a flooded roadway, “Turn Around…Don’t Drown!”

Follow these safety rules:
■ If flooding occurs, get to higher ground. Stay away from flood-prone areas, including dips, low spots,
valleys, ditches, washes, etc.
■ Avoid flooded areas or those with rapid water flow. Do not attempt to cross a flowing stream. It takes only six
inches of fast flowing water to sweep you off your feet.
■ Don’t allow children to play near high water, storm drains or ditches. Hidden dangers could lie beneath the
water.
■ Flooded roads could have significant damage hidden by floodwaters. NEVER drive through floodwaters or on
flooded roads. Water only two feet deep can float away most automobiles.
■ Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams and washes, particularly when threatening conditions exist.
■ Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.
■ Purchase and monitor NOAA All Hazards Weather Radio or visit http://www.flashweatheralerts.org to download a severe weather alerts App for your iOS or Android powered device.

Wildfire Safety

Create a defensible space by landscaping with fire-resistant plants and removing other fuels. Follow us on pinterest for more tips during National Preparedness Month.

Wildfire safety

You can help protect your home and property from wildfire by doing yard work and home maintenance before fire season.

Remove fuels that can lead flames to your home or that can become ignited from windblown embers, including:

  • Dead grass, leaves, etc. (fine fuels) and dead twigs, branches, etc. (coarse fuels) within 30 feet of buildings
  • Dry leaf/pine litter from roofs, rain gutters, decks and walkways
  • Dead and dry litter at the base of plants
  • Tree branches (ladder fuels) within 6-10 feet of the ground
  • Firewood within 30 feet of buildings
  • Continuous beds of combustible vegetation (on the ground or in tree tops) that can bring large flames within 100 feet of your home

Plant species that retain moisture and resist ignition, including:

  • Native, fire-resistant vegetation (check with local forestry agency)
  • Fire prone trees and shrubs away from your home and far enough apart, so they won’t ignite one another

Maintain

  • A lean, clean and green landscape at least 30 feet around buildings
  • A legible and clearly marked street number for emergency responders
  • Storage sheds containing items including lawn mowers, grills/gas cans and tanks away from the home

Install metal screening that blocks embers from entering your buildings, including:

  • Noncombustible 1/8 inch on attic/crawl space vents, and around low decks
  • Noncombustible (metal, etc.) skirting around mobile homes

Identify an emergency water supply within 1,000 feet of your home through one of the following:

  • Community water/hydrant system, and/or
  • Drafting site on a lake
  • Cooperative emergency storage tank with neighbors
  • Swimming pool

If under a wildfire threat; only remove dead leaves or vegetation when local garbage collection services will have time to pick up the debris. Do not burn vegetation without following local requirements.

REMEMBER severe wildfires move fast and embers can be blown more than a mile from the flames so be ready.

Safe Rooms Save Lives

Supermoms and superdads always install a safe room to protect their family from high winds.

Safe rooms save lives

See our Pinterest campaign for daily tips throughout National Preparedness Month

Tornado Safe Room Tips

Safe Room Construction Options

  • Safe rooms can be site-built or manufactured and can be installed in new or existing homes.
  • Site-built safe rooms can be constructed with concrete, concrete masonry, and combinations of wood frame and steel sheathing or concrete masonry infill.
  • Manufactured safe-rooms are usually built at a plant or assembled on-site.

Performance

  • Wind Forces and Debris Impacts – Safe rooms must be designed for wind speeds up to 250 mph and debris impacts from a 15 lb. 2×4 board traveling at 100 mph.
  • Safe rooms must be structurally independent from the main structure of your home.
  • Safe rooms must be securely anchored to the foundation or to a reinforced concrete slab.
  • Safe rooms installed in or over a crawl space must have a separate foundation.
  • All components of safe rooms, including walls, ceilings, and door assemblies, must be designed, tested to resist specified wind forces and prevent perforation by windborne debris.
  • Safe rooms must have adequate ventilation.

Location

  • Safe rooms can be located on the first floor, in a basement or outside a home.
  • Shelters located outside your home should be accessed immediately when a storm warning is issued.

Testing and Quality Verification

  • Site-built safe rooms should be constructed in accordance with the prescriptive designs of FEMA 320 guidance Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room For Your Home or Small Business, and meet the ICC/NSSA 500 standard.
  • Manufactured safe rooms and site built safe rooms that deviate from FEMA 320 or the ICC/NSSA 500 standard must be tested for debris impact resistance at an approved laboratory such as the Wind Engineering Research Center at Texas Tech University.
  • Verification of compliance with National Storm Shelter Association’s “Association Standard,” required for membership in the Association, provides the highest level of residential shelter quality.